We’ve moved!

Thank you to all of our readers who have been following this blog. We have now moved to the Lancaster University Law School’s website at http://www.lancaster.ac.uk/law/blogs/staff/

We are in the process of transferring the blog posts from these pages to the blog archive on our new website.  All new blog posts will appear on the new site.

Thank you,

Lancaster University Law School


What is “Proper Medical Treatment”?

Dr Sara Fovargue, Lancaster University
Dr Alexandra Mullock, University of Manchester

The relationship between medical practice and criminal law is much closer than many realise. Doctors are permitted to do things that others are not, provided that what they do is regarded as ‘proper medical treatment’. The legal justification for bodily invasions in the medical context has developed according to the ‘medical exception’ to the criminal law discussed by the House of Lords in the cases of R v Brown [1993] and Airedale NHS Trust v Bland [1994], and by the Law Commission in 1994. As those involved in sado-masochistic activities discovered in Brown, consent, in the absence of medical (or legitimate sporting) justification, is not enough to make harming others lawful. And in Bland, while it was legitimate for the doctors to withdraw life-sustaining treatment, if a concerned relative did the same it would become a criminal matter.

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Via @ConversationUK – Twenty years after Srebrenica, ethnic cleansing has become a defence to genocide

Prof James A. Sweeney

James A. Sweeney (@James_Sweeney_) is Professor of International Law in the Law School at Lancaster University.  He has published widely in the areas of human rights and refugee law, and is the author of The European Court of Human Rights in the Post-Cold War Era: Universality in Transition, the first monograph to examine transitional justice in the jurisprudence of the ECHR.  His work on the human rights of failed asylum seekers, [2008] Public Law 277-301, has the distinction of being cited with approval both by the House of Lords and the Court of Appeal, in the cases of R (on the application of M) v Slough BC [2008] UKHL 52, [28], and SL v Westminster City Council [2011] EWCA Civ 954, [16].

You can find out more about James’ research at http://www.lancaster.ac.uk/fass/law/profiles/james-sweeney

Via @ConversationUK – How Osborne’s new cuts breach the UK’s human rights obligations

Dr Amanda Cahill-Ripley

Amanda Cahill-Ripley (@AmandaCahillRip) is a Lecturer in Law and author of The Human Right to Water and its Application in the Occupied Palestinian Territories, Routledge, 2013 (paperback).  Her main research interests are international human rights, in particular economic and social rights; human rights, conflict and transitional justice; rights and development.

You can find out more about Amanda’s research at http://www.lancaster.ac.uk/fass/law/profiles/amanda-cahill-ripley

Hate violence is a global problem – and a crime against humanity via @ConversationUK

Prof Paul Iganski

Writing in The Conversation today, Professor Paul Iganski discusses the Charleston Shootings and the daily reality of hate crime.

Paul Iganski (@H8Hurts) is Professor of Criminology and Criminal Justice in the Lancaster University Law School, UK.  Paul is on the Management Board of the Lancaster University ESRC Centre for Corpus Approaches to Social Sciences (CASS) and leads a CASS research project on The management of hateful invective by the courts. His latest book, Hate Crime. A Global Perspective, written together with Jack Levin from Northeastern University’s Brudnick Center on Violence and Conflict, in Boston, was published in May 2015.

You can find out more Paul’s work at http://www.lancaster.ac.uk/fass/law/profiles/paul-iganski;


Women Who Buy Sex (@womenwhobuysex)

Andrew Goddard

As sex industry research expands, so too do sex work preconceptions. A popular stereotype and ‘myth’ is that men are always the sex purchasers, and women the service providers. However, a recent study by Lancaster University demonstrates women buy sexual services too, in a range of settings and scenarios.

This study, led by Dr Sarah Kingston of Lancaster University promises to be the most in-depth analysis of female clients in the sex industry ever undertaken in the UK, and the early results are revealing.

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via @Daily_Express – link to #LancsLaw research on @womenwhobuysex

Lancaster University Law School’s Dr Sarah Kingston and Manchester Metropolitan University’s Dr Natalie Hammond research into @womenwhobuysex

You can find out more about Sarah’s research at http://www.lancaster.ac.uk/fass/law/profiles/sarah-kingston