Category Archives: Internet Governance

Lancaster University Law School Professor in the News

Professor Suzanne Ost writes in The Guardian about John Grisham’s comments about child abuse images.

Suzanne Ost’s other blog posts include ‘Now you see them now you don’t? The battle to block online child sexual abuse images‘ with Siobhan Weare (@SiobhanWeare), and ‘A right to die or a step too far? Assisted dying and being ‘tired of life’

Suzanne Ost (@SuzanneOst3737is Professor of Law in the Law School at Lancaster. She researches in the areas of medical law and ethics and child sexual exploitation. She is the co-author of Medicine and Bioethics in the Theatre of the Criminal Process and is the Editor-in-Chief of the Medical Law Review.

You can find out more about Suzanne’s research at http://www.lancaster.ac.uk/fass/law/profiles/suzanne-ost

 

 

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Googling Jurors: the Law Commission Proposals

Prof Alisdair A. Gillespie

In December the Law Commission produced their first report on contempt of court. This is a tricky area of law and the Law Commission has decided (correctly) that it is necessary to consider the issue over several pieces. The first report concerns juror misconduct and, in particular, internet publications.

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Fixing the Internet?: Reflections on the Internet Governance Forum

Dr Catherine Easton (@EastonCatherine) reflects on the Internet Governance Forum 2013, an event which occurred in the shadow of the Snowden leaks, saw China lecturing the United States about its surveillance policies, but which also demonstrated the passion and commitment of many delegates and groups in the face of increasing corporate and State control of the Internet.

The 8th Internet Governance Forum (IGF) (http://igf2013.or.id/about-igf-2013/ ) was held in Bali, Indonesia in October.  The IGF is an annual event established by the United Nations Secretary-General in 2006 following a mandate initiated at the World Summit on the Information Society (http://www.itu.int/wsis/index.html)   OK, so what does this mean?  It is a multi-stakeholder forum bringing together representatives from government, businesses, academia and civil society to engage in open dialogue on the rules and principles governing the Internet.  As a novice IGF attendee I was keen to learn how this initiative worked in practice and to try to gauge its relevance in shaping the Internet’s development.

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